6 futurist predictions about technology that actually came true

Author

Mark Molloy

February 4, 2015

A look at some of the technology foreshadowed in days of yore and sci-fi classics

Nobody can predict the future, but there have been some pretty good educated (or lucky) guesses down the years.

While most us are waiting for the hoverboard to hurry up and get built already, some inventions and predictions dreamt up by sci-fi scriptwriters have become a reality.

A few hints about what the future may hold have even been spotted in ancient statues on display in the Louvre.

Beyoncé was among the first to bring this to our attention with an art selfie in 2014.

We take a look at some of the technology imagined in years gone by that actually exists today.

6. Handheld technology

If you thought the art of taking a perfect selfie was only practiced by the Instagram generation, think again.

Here are a few examples of when art inadvertently predicted the future.

Best part of the Louvre was the statue of an ancient smartphone user taking a selfie pic.twitter.com/nveGrn6RBQ

— Federico Viticci (@viticci) April 25, 2014

“The wife discovers browser history” -Author unknown, oil on canvas, 1768. pic.twitter.com/H5LY1M9ioU

— Meredith Frost (@MeredithFrost) May 1, 2014

5. Big Brother

OK, so the selfie may not have been predicted in ancient times, but George Orwell knew exactly what was going on back in 1949.

“Big Brother is watching you,” wrote the India-born author in his dystopian classic Nineteen Eighty-Four.

His vision of a surveillance society in which governments monitor and keep tabs on what we are doing is a reality today.

4. Rocket power

French novelist Jules Verne is widely considered to be one of the founders of the sci-fi genre.

In 1865, he published the novel From the Earth to the Moon, imagining humankind’s first trip to space in a rocket, even predicting it would leave from Florida.

3. Touchscreen technology

It’s difficult to imagine now how we would cope on a day-to-day basis without our touchscreen smartphones.

In cult sci-fi series The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams describes a device you simply “had to brush the panels with your fingers” to operate.

2. 3D printers

From a working gun to mending broken bones, 3D printing technology is advancing at an astonishing rate.

The Star Trek replicator, capable of creating food almost instantaneously, first appeared in The Next Generation TV series in 1987.

1. Self-tying laces

Back to the Future II imagines a world with hoverboards, flying cars and most importantly of all – self-tying laces.

Nike plans to release trainers similar to the ones worn by Marty McFly in the sequel to the sci-fi classic later this year.

This article was written by Mark Molloy from The Daily Telegraph and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

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